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Tech and Talk With Shivam and Saad

 

Shivam V. and Saad S.

Gallagher A3

 

The guide to communication in India.

 

     Technology is developing at an exponential rate. With a population of 1,155,347,700 people, how do Indians manage to communicate with others inside and outside their country? More importantly, how many people actually use phones, and how often? Some people live in small societies with their extended families. Others live in metropolises far away from their roots. Some prefer the big cities, while others like their rural lives. These factors affect communication drastically. As India modernizes, more people will leave their old style of living and move on to new westernized ones. This includes changes in the use of cell phones, email, and social networking. How will this affect communication? Only the future can tell.

 

 

Nokia and Motorola - Two major cellular phone service providers in India - comes with free games

 

Here, a rural village's only connection to the outside world is a bus that comes now and then, but families live close together.

 

 This is modern day Bangalore, India. Phones and email are very common here, but families live far away from each other.

 

Computers, Smart Phones, and Fax Machines are essential to the daily lives of many Indians.

 

 

Shivam supports the Traditional Side

Saad supports the Modern Side

 

Shivam - What are you doing? Families should live close together. They have their family business, and to communicate, they only need to walk to the next house.

 

Saad – But as India modernizes, it opens up endless possibilities. People must move into the future. We are developing quickly and must catch up before we are left behind.

 

Shivam – What is this nonsense!? Who cares about them? This is how we have been living for thousands of years!

 

Saad – Exactly why we need to develop faster! Look at what cell phones can do!

 

(Saad calls Vikrant)

 

Vikrant - Hey Saad.

 

Shivam - What is this magic!!!

 

(Shivam takes cricket bat and smashes phone)

 

Saad - WHAT ARE YOU DOING!?!?! That cost me 200 rupees!

 

Shivam - You are caught by the evil spirits. Do not worry, I will save you.

 

(Shivam starts chanting prayers)

 

Saad - No, you see, I can communicate with Vikrant, who is all the way in America! Isn’t that amazing?

 

Shivam - What is this!? You are being absorbed by those foolish Americans and their Western Traditions!?

 

Saad - No Shivam. Stop living in the past.

 

Shivam - I am not living in the past! I am living in reality!

 

Saad - Only if it is opposite day. Then in that case I shall live in imagination. Good Bye!

 

(Saad exits)

 

(Shivam becomes lonely)

 

click in order

 

Narrator 1

 

 

Modern View(Saad) 2

 

 

                                     

Old Ways View(Shivam) 3

 

 

 

Narrator 4

 


 

 

 

 

Works Cited

http://www.indianetzone.com/40/communication_india.htm

http://www.anthroarcheart.org/tblz641.htm

http://www.funonthenet.in/content/view/276/31/

 

Tech and Talk With Shivam and Saad 

Shivam V. and Saad S.

 

The guide to communication in India.

 

     Technology is developing at an exponential rate. With a population of 1,155,347,700 people, how do Indians manage to communicate with others inside and outside their country? More importantly, how many people actually use phones, and how often? Some people live in small societies with their extended families. Others live in metropolises far away from their roots. These factors affect the communication drastically. As India modernizes, more people will leave their old style of living and move on to new westernized ones. This includes changes in the use of cell phones, email, and social networking. Is this a good thing or a bad thing? How will this affect communication? Will people embrace this or neglect it? How will this affect the economy? How will this change India's people? Only the future can tell.

 

 

 

Nokia and Motorola - Two major cellular phone service providers in India - comes with free games

 

 

Here, a rural village's only connection to the outside world is a bus that comes now and then, but families live close together.

 

 

 This is modern day Bangalore, India. Phones and email are very common here, but families live far away from each other.

 

 

Computers, Smart Phones, and Fax Machines are essential to the daily lives of many Indians.

 

 

Shivam supports the Traditional Side

Saad supports the Modern Side

 

Shivam - What are you doing? Families should live close together. They have their family business, and to communicate, they only need to walk to the next house

 

Saad – But as India modernizes, it opens up endless possibilities. People must move into the future. We are developing quickly and must catch up before we are left behind.

 

Shivam – What is this nonsense!? Who cares about them? This is how we have been living for years!

 

Saad – Exactly why we need to develop faster! Look at what cell phones can do!

 

(Saad calls Vikrant)

 

Vikrant: Hey Saad.

 

Shivam: What is this magic!!!

 

(Shivam takes cricket bat and smashes phone)

 

Saad: WHAT ARE YOU DOING!?!?! That cost me 200 rupees!

 

Shivam: You are caught by the evil spirits. Do not worry, I will save you.

 

(Shivam starts chanting prayers)

 

Saad: No, you see, I can communicate with Vikrant, who is all the way in America! Isn’t that amazing?

 

Shivam: What is this!? You are being absorbed by those foolish Americans and their Vestern Traditions!?

 

Saad: No Shivam. Stop living in the past.

 

Shivam: I am not living in the past! I am living in reality!

 

Saad: Then I shall live in imagination. Good Bye!

 

(Saad exits)

 

(Shivam becomes lonely)

 

Works Cited

http://www.indianetzone.com/40/communication_india.htm

http://www.anthroarcheart.org/tblz641.htm

http://www.funonthenet.in/content/view/276/31/

 

 

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