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GA47

Page history last edited by Ryan Mack 8 years, 8 months ago

Is Arranged Marriage Really Any Worse than Craigslist?

 

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Approximately 95% of marriages in India are arranged. In the past, marriages were completely controlled by the parents. Now, it is more of a team effort between the son or daughter and his or her parents. When a man or woman is ready to get married, his or her parents use matrimonial ads - similar to newspaper personal ads - or network through friends and family to find possible candidates to marry their children. This is sometimes a source of conflict between children and parents. 91% of people surveyed said that they would rather find their own partner, though 57% said they would consider an arranged marriage if they could not find a partner on their own. This wiki will describe both sides of the argument: for and against arranged marriages.

 

 

 

Arranged marriages, just like regular marriages, have many advantages.  One positive aspect is that arranged marriages seem to be more successful than love marriages. This is caused by many different things, such as the great support their parents show of the marriage. Since the parents arranged for their son/daughter to marry the other, they cannot say they made a wrong decision and forget about it. It is their responsibility to try to keep it alive and their parents and to support it as long as possible. It is also good for people who believe in horoscopes and astrology, because you can marry someone who is “good for you.” Arranged marriages also ensure that you are in the same social class or caste, part of the same culture and religion, and that the daughter will most likely be living the same lifestyle she is used to.

 

                 

This image shows the negative side of arranged marriage. Traditionally, the parents of a young adult choose a spouse for their child. According to an editorial in The Toronto Star, "Choices are personal and dependent on the core values of person making the decision. Arranged marriage is not a personal choice. It is other people who are making the choices for the couples."

The divorce rate in India would be the only statistic that would display the failures of marriages. However, divorce is not an option in areas where arranged marriage is practiced. The two people joined in an arranged marriage must conform to the parents' ideas of union and tradition.

 

Mock Dialogue 

 

Namaste, Mom and Dad!

 

 

Greetings, daughter. 

 

 

I found someone I really like and I want to marry him!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hold up. We already have someone for you to marry. He is perfectly qualified!

 

 

But... but... Come on, just meet the guy. He's really nice. 

 

 

Hi!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nononononononono. No no. No!  This is who you're going to marry.

 

 

Hallo.

 

 

He's one of India's best doctors and will be a lovely husband for you.

 

 

Come on, William is an engineer and I actually love him!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our marriage was arranged, and we are just fine. 

 

 

Please?

 

 

Okay fine. 

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

 

 

BONET W3B Media - Portal Home. Web. 13 May 2011.

 

Gautham, S. "Coming next: The monsoon divorce; In India, even today, 90 percent of marriages are arranged. But after the lavish ceremonies how many survive?"      New Statesman [1996] 18 Feb. 2002: 32+. General OneFile. Web. 13 May 2011.

 

"India's Arranged Marriage Traditions Live on in U.S., Yet Can Cause Conflict | Mndaily.com - Serving the University of Minnesota Community Since 1900." News |      Mndaily.com - Serving the University of Minnesota Community Since 1900. Web. 13 May 2011.

 

"No choice in arranged marriages." Toronto Star [Toronto, Ontario] 7 Apr. 2010: 22. Global Issues In Context. Web. 13 May 2011.

 

"Tug of War Photo from Incredible India." A Day in the Life of India - The Times of India. Web. 13 May 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

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